Category: Uncategorized

Clifton North – New Flower Park Opened

Labour Councillor for Clifton North, Josh Cook, joined Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture, Dave Trimble at the official opening of the new play area at Clifton Flower Park in spring.

Local residents had their say on designs for the new play area over the winter. The comments were taken into account when designing the new play area which cost around £60,000.

Councillor Dave Trimble said, ‘It was really good to see so many kids at the event enjoying the activities and the new play area.’

Labour Councillor for Clifton North, Josh Cook said, ‘At the last election we pledged to improve play and youth facilities in parks and playing fields in Clifton North. The new play area at Clifton Flower Park is a step in the right direction and we will continue to make improvements for local residents. I hope the park will continue to be popular and used by families all year round.’

Josh, local MP Lilian and Dave at the event

Bulwell Forest – Knights Close Regeneration

Labour Councillors for Bulwell Forest, Nick and Eunice have been considering plans for the regeneration at Knights Close.

The demolition of the shops and the flats above them is under consideration. Nottingham City Council has bought the site of the former Harvesters pub that already has planning permission for housing. A small block of garages would also be demolished.

All tenants affected have been approached with an outline of the proposals and would be appropriately relocated.

A set of drawings has been produced to show what is possible, showing a replacement shop and brand new houses built to a modern eco-friendly standard. If the project is given the go ahead, there will be detailed plans and residents will be formally asked for their input and kept up to speed with anything that happens.

Eunice discussing plans for Knights Close

Bulwell in Bloom

£100,000 has been used to create the new Bulwell Community Meadow, thanks to campaigning from Labour Councillors, former MP, Graham Allen and local residents.

Local school children were involved in helping to design features at the meadow and the site has been improved through the addition of formal pathways and a wildflower meadow.

Pupils worked with local artist Chris Campbell to design new seating and entrance features on a wildlife theme, including ladybirds, butterflies and flowers. The meadow is also home to a nature trail that features natural history designs.

Bulwell Labour Councillor, Ginny Klein, said ‘It is great to see the new Bulwell Meadow being enjoyed by local residents now that the weather has improved. Graham Allen our former MP for Nottingham North did some excellent work here and we will continue to work with the new MP, Alex Norris.

Jackie was joined by former MP Graham Allen and local school children at the opening event

Basford – Inroads to Improvement

Councillors have been able to pay for more improvements to roads and pavements this year, although there is still a lot more they would like to do. 

Following concerns raised by parents new bollards were installed outside Southwark School. 

Councillor Linda Woodings said ‘This was a major concern of local parents and we hope the new bollards have stopped cars blocking the pavement and improved the visibility for children trying to cross the road at busy times. Safety around schools is really important to us and we’d ask people dropping off their children by car to try to park safely for other road users.’   

On Brooklyn Bridge, funding has been approved for a higher fence. This is because the slope down from the current boundary has been a regular spot for fly-tipping. 

On Heatherley Drive and Runton Drive a new pavement surface has been laid.    

On Fenton Road the two bus stops have had clearways installed to make sure buses can safely pass down the road without obstruction from parked cars.  

Linda, local MP Alex and Cat inspecting Basford roadworks

Alan Clark Memorial

Councillor Alan Clark has a proud history of service to Nottingham. He was pivotal in establishing Robin Hood Energy, the first council-owned, not-for-profit energy company that aimed to provide the cheapest possible energy to Nottingham residents, and for the fitting of thousands of solar panels to Nottingham homes.

Alan was also instrumental in drawing up the Nottingham Declaration, an agreement signed in 2000 by over 300 councils that signalled a political commitment to tackle climate change – a breakthrough at the time.

Alan’s biggest legacy has been making Nottingham one of the greenest cities in the UK; however the impact he had on his community was far reaching.

At a local level, Alan helped 100’s of his constituents from when he was first elected in 1988. Alan was loved and respected by individuals and community groups in Bulwell, Top Valley, Rise Park, Highbury Vale and the surrounding areas.

He was also particularly committed to ensuring local children had the best start in life and was a governor for 3 local schools; serving as Chair of Governors for Southwold Primary for 30 years.

Leader of the Council and long-time friend Jon Collins said, ‘Alan will be deeply missed and he has worked tirelessly for his local community over the last 29 years.’  Former MP for Nottingham North, Graham Allen said, ‘Alan would always put the people first and to work alongside him has been a privilege.’

The funeral service for Councillor Clark was held at St Mary’s The Virgin Church, Lace Market this morning (14th August) and was very well attended. Council staff, Labour Party colleagues and members of the community joined Alan’s close friends and family for the service.

Our thoughts are with Alan’s family and friends at this time, particularly his wife, Councillor Eunice Campbell. He will be greatly missed by his colleagues and comrades of the Labour Party.

 

National Recognition for Nottingham Parks

Labour Councillor Dave Trimble displaying this years Green Flags
Green Flag Awards

Nottingham’s parks and open spaces have received national recognition by achieving 56 Green Flag Awards.  The awards are given by environmental charity Keep Britain Tidy to parks that have the highest possible environmental standards, are beautifully maintained, have excellent visitor facilities and are regarded as one of the best parks in the country.

Three additional parks achieved green flag status this year, making Nottingham the City Council with the highest number in the UK.

18 sites received Green Flag Community Awards and are managed by local community groups; they include the City Hospital Garden, St Ann’s Community Orchard and Meadows Library Garden.

Park Improvements

There has been extensive cuts from central government funding, however 77 play areas have been improved in Nottingham since 2010. £36 million of external funding has been achieved since 2007. Thanks to work from volunteers and parks staff, a massive 96% of residents are satisfied with parks and open spaces.

Labour Councillor and Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture, Dave Trimble said, ‘We’re really pleased with the amount of green flags we have received this year and it’s great that so many sites that are managed by the community have been recognised too.’

‘As Labour Councillors we made a commitment to work with local people and deliver more Green Flag Award winning parks. We have improved the numbers year on year and people are enjoying the benefits.’

To find a Green Flag Park near you click here, or to find out what’s on in Nottingham during the summer holidays, click here.

Derby and Nottingham – Gym and Swim Offer

By announcing the launch of the Nottingham and Derby Metro Strategy 2030 in May, the two cities and their councils have made a commitment to work more closely together for the benefit of the whole area and its residents.

The aim of the strategy is to bring together resources and make the region an exciting place to live, work and place by 2030.

Last week, the two Labour led Councils announced a Gym and Swim membership offer, meaning that residents with gym and swim membership in one city will also be able to use facilities in the other city at no extra cost.

Labour Councillor and Portfolio Holder for Leisure and Culture in Nottingham, Dave Trimble said: ‘Leisure is an ideal area for us to look at how we can bring benefits to local people in both Derby and Nottingham through the two City Councils working more closely together.’

‘There are around 40,000 people who commute between the two cities to work. It makes good sense for us to offer gym and swim membership to Derby residents who work in Nottingham, and vice versa, so they can make use of the facilities at a time that suits them.’

Another benefit for residents of both cities includes a £1 discount on Trentbarton buses to travel to events such as Splendour in Nottingham or the Hannells Darley Park Concert in Derby this summer.

For more information on the gym and swim offer, please click here.

Labour Leading the Way in Fight Against Fuel Poverty

In the Labour Manifesto that was launched on Tuesday 16th May, the party outlined the ambition to ‘Support the creation of publicly owned, locally accountable energy companies and co-operatives to rival existing private energy suppliers’.

This commitment follows the launch of Robin Hood Energy in 2015, a not for profit energy company that was brought to fruition by Nottingham Labour Councillors. The company provides a discounted rate of energy for City residents and provides strong competition to the ‘Big 6’.

1000’s of city residents have benefited from switching to Robin Hood Energy and the company has made positive steps in combatting fuel poverty, something that affects one in ten households across the UK.

The Labour manifesto highlights that energy customers in the UK are overcharged by £2 billion per year, however regionally based, accountable and not for profit energy suppliers such as Robin Hood Energy would ensure that residents are not being unfairly and unnecessarily charged.

Leader of Nottingham City Council, Councillor Jon Collins said ‘Robin Hood Energy is an example of how fuel poverty can be tackled and how setting up not for profit energy companies, at a local level, can give people an alternative to the big 6.

A Labour Government could use this model all over the country and stop people being exploited by huge companies.’

The Conservative manifesto does not support locally owned energy companies that are not for profit, instead they are content with people all over the UK being overcharged by huge multi-national corporations. Labour has shown ambition to drive energy prices down and end fuel poverty for people all over the UK, both locally and nationally.

Nottingham Labour Committed to a Green Future

Nottingham Labour has all the right policies in place for our green future, such as the Nottingham Community Climate Change Strategy 2012-2020 and our commitments to Climate Local, the Nottingham Declaration, UK100 and a pledge to end fuel poverty.

We have a lot of programmes underway with existing funding.

  • Through Salix interest-free loans we have spent over £2m on energy efficiency on our buildings  since 2009, saving  £500, 000 a year and 4.5T of CO2.
  • We have used Government funding (HNDU) to pay for various feasibility and mapping studies to look at projects to expand or make more efficient the district heating scheme that should progress in the next few months.
  • Horizon 2020 (EU) funding has triggered the REMOURBAN programme of smart cities measures including deep retrofits (energy efficiency, generation, and storage) of 366 homes worth £5.5m (about 50% matched by tenants’ money).
  • The Big Six ECO scheme has enabled around 6000 homes to be fitted with external wall insulation – about 4000 social houses and 2000 private.  Match funding came from the rent account and Green Deal for Communities Fund.
  • We used Feed In Tariffs to fit 4000 homes with solar panels before the tariff dropped dramatically.
  • We have an Ultra Low Emission Vehicles programme (Government funding) for £6m of work on electric buses, rolling out electric car chargers, and helping businesses to switch fleet to electric.

But many of these funding streams have been stopped, reduced or will be withdrawn.

What we now need are clear proposals from Government on future funding.  We can make most schemes work, and would not invest unless we make a long-term saving, but we need certainty and stability of schemes.

It takes time to train a workforce in some of these skills (fitting solar panels, installing solid wall insulation and so on), and so many young people, nationwide, have been let down by training in a skill that is still needed but that people can no longer afford.

Our next set of schemes is ready, we can flex our priorities to meet Government targets, but we must ask what are their priorities now?

Our priorities are clear.  We want to lift residents out of fuel poverty when the figures are moving relentlessly the other way.  We want to attract whatever funding is available.  We want to engage with local communities.

Will there be energy proposals from Phillip Hammond in his Spring Budget?  I wonder.

Councillor Alan Clark, Portfolio Holder for Energy and Sustainability

Nottingham Works – Helping Young People into Employment and Training

Over the past year, Nottingham Works has helped hundreds of young people into work or training places. The programme, that is funded in partnership between Nottingham City Council and the European Union, provides mentoring for 18-29 year olds who are unemployed, Traineeships for 16-24 year olds and general careers support and guidance. The scheme also offers financial support to employers who create jobs for young people.

Nottingham Labour made a manifesto commitment in 2015 to guarantee a job, training place or further education place for every 18-24 year old in the city; that is why Nottingham City Council and Labour Councillors secured the £6.9 million in EU funding to make this project possible.

The scheme is designed to help young people, who are at risk of social exclusion, into work. Last year alone the scheme supported;

  • 550 people into the Intensive Careers Support programme

 

  • 124 people into Traineeship’s

 

  • 50 people into Nottingham North Traineeship’s

 

  • 199 people into the Step into Work programme

 

  • 30 employers through the Nottingham Jobs Fund Plus

In addition to supporting projects such as Nottingham Works, Nottingham Labour has helped to ensure that all entry level jobs and training places at Nottingham City Council are only available for city residents.

If you would like more information or to see what support is available to you, please visit the Nottingham Jobs or Nottingham City Council website.

Councillor Sam Webster, Portfolio Holder for Education, Employment and Skills.